Spreadsheets, statistics, mathematics and computational thinking

We need to teach all our students how to design, create, test, debug and use spreadsheets. We need to teach this integrated with mathematics, statistics and computational thinking. Spreadsheets can be a valuable tool in many other subject areas including biology, physics, history and geography, thus facilitating integrated learning experiences.

Spreadsheets are versatile and ubiquitous – and most have errors. A web search on “How many spreadsheets have errors?” gives alarming results. The commonly quoted figure is 88%. These spreadsheets with errors are not just little home spreadsheets for cataloguing your Lego collection or planning your next vacation. These spreadsheets with errors involve millions of dollars, and life-affecting medical and scientific research.

Using spreadsheets to teach statistics

Use a spreadsheet to draw graphs

One of the great contributions computers make to statistical analysis is the ability to display graphs of non-trivial sets of data without onerous drawing by hand. In the early 1980s I had a summer job as a research assistant to a history professor. One of my tasks was to create a series of graphs of the imports and exports for New Zealand over several decades, illustrating the effect of the UK joining the Common Market (now the EU). It required fastidious drawing and considerable time. (And correcting fluid) These same graphs can now be created almost instantaneously, and the requirement has shifted to interpreting these graphs.

Similarly, in the classroom we should not be requiring students of any age to draw statistical graphs by hand. Drawing statistical graphs by hand is a waste of time. Students may enjoy creating the graphs by hand – I understand that – it is rewarding and not cognitively taxing. So is colouring in. The important skill that students need is to be able to read the graph – to find out what it is telling them and what it is not telling them. Their time would be far better spent looking at multiple graphs of different types, and learning how to report and critique them. They also need to be able to decide what graph will best show what they are looking for or communicating. (There will be teachers saying students need to draw graphs by hand to understand them. I’d like to know the evidence for this claim. People have said for years that students need to calculate standard deviation by hand to understand it, and I reject that also.)

At primary school level, the most useful graph is almost always the bar or column chart. These are easily created physically using data cards, or by entering category totals and using a spreadsheet. Here is a video showing just how easy it is.

Use a spreadsheet for statistical calculations

Spreadsheets are also very capable of calculating summary statistics and creating hypothesis tests and confidence intervals. Dedicated statistical packages are better, but spreadsheets are generally good enough. I would also teach pivot-tables as soon as possible, but that is a topic for another day.

Using spreadsheets to teach mathematics

Spreadsheets are so versatile! Spreadsheets help students to understand the concept of a variable. When you write a formula in a cell, you are creating an algebraic formula. Spreadsheets illustrate the need for sensible rounding and numeric display. Use of order of operations and brackets is essential. They can be used for exploring patterns and developing number sense. I have taught algebraic graphing, compared with line fitting using spreadsheets. Spreadsheets can solve algebraic problems. Spreadsheets make clear the concept of mathematics as a model. Combinatorics and Graph Theory are also enabled through spreadsheets. For users using a screenreader, the linear nature of formulas in spreadsheets makes it easier to read.

Using spreadsheets to teach computational thinking

In New Zealand we are rolling out a new curriculum for information technology, including  computational thinking. At primary school level, computational thinking includes “[students] develop and debug simple programs that use inputs, outputs, sequence and iteration.” (Progress outcome 3, which is signposted to be reached at about Year 7) Later the curriculum includes branching.

In most cases the materials include unplugged activities, and coding using programmes such as Scratch or Java script. Robots such as Sphero and Lego make it all rather exciting.

All of these ideas can also be taught using a spreadsheet. Good spreadsheet design has clear inputs and outputs. The operations need to be performed in sequence, and iteration occurs when we have multiple rows in a spreadsheet. Spreadsheets need to be correct, robust and easy to use and modify. These are all important principles in coding. Unfortunately too many people have never had the background in coding and program design and thus their spreadsheets are messy, fragile, oblique and error-prone.

When we teach spreadsheets well to our students we are giving them a gift that will be useful for their life.

Experience teaching spreadsheets

I designed and taught a course in quantitative methods for business, heavily centred on spreadsheets. The students were required to use spreadsheets for mathematical and statistical tasks. Many students have since expressed their gratitude that they are capable of creating and using spreadsheets, a skill that has proved useful in employment.

 

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Why decimals are difficult

Why decimals are difficult

Recently a couple of primary teachers admitted a little furtively to me that they “never got decimals”. It got me wondering about what was difficult about decimals. For people who “get” decimals, they are just another number, with the decimal point showing. Clearly this was not the case for all.

So in true 21st century style I Googled it: “Why are decimals difficult”

I got some wonderfully interesting results, one of which is a review paper by Hugues Lortie-Forgues, Jing Tian and Robert S. Siegler, entitled “Why is learning fraction and decimal arithmetic so difficult?”, which I draw on in this post.

You need to know

For teachers of statistics, this is important. In particular, students learning about statistics sometimes have difficulty identifying if a p-value of 0.035 is smaller or larger than the alpha value of 0.05. In this post I talk about why that may be. I will also give links to a couple of videos that might be helpful for them. For teachers of mathematics it might give some useful insights.

Whole numbers and rational numbers

Whole numbers are the numbers we start with when we begin to learn maths – 1, 2, 3, 4,… and 0. Zero has an interesting role of having no magnitude in itself, but acting as a place-filler to make sure we can tell the meaning of a number. Without zero, 2001 and 201 and 21 would all look the same! From early on we recognise that longer numbers represent larger quantities. We know that a salary with lots of zeroes is better than one with only a few. $1000000 is more than $200 even though 2 is greater than 1.

Rational numbers are the ones that come in between, but also include whole numbers. All of the following are considered rational numbers: ½, 0.3, 4/5, 34.87, 3¾, 2000

When we talk about whole numbers, we can say what number comes before and after the number. 35 comes before 36. 37 comes after 36. But with rational numbers, we cannot do this. There are infinite rational numbers in any given interval. Between 0 and 1 there are infinite rational numbers.

Rational numbers are usually expressed as fractions (½, 3¾) or decimals (0.3, 34.87).

There are several things that make rational numbers (fractions and decimals) tricky. In this post I focus on decimals

Decimal notation and size of number

As I explained before, when we learn about whole numbers, we learn a useful rule-of-thumb that longer strings of digits correspond to larger numbers. However, the length of the decimal is unrelated to its magnitude. For example, 10045 is greater than 230. The longer number corresponds to greater magnitude. But 0.10045 is less than 0.230. We look at the first digit after the point to find out which number is bigger. The way that you judge which is bigger out of two decimals is quite different from how you do it with whole numbers. The second of my videos illustrates this.

Effect of multiplying by numbers between 0 and 1

The results of multiplying by decimals between 0 and 1 are different from what we are used to.

When we learn about multiplication of whole numbers, we find that when we multiply, the answer will always be bigger than both of the numbers we are multiplying.
3 × 4 = 12. 12 is greater than either 3 or 4.
However, if we multiply 0.3 × 0.4 we get 0.12, which is smaller than either 0.3 and 0.4. Or if we multiply 6 by 0.4, we get 2.4, which is less than 6, but greater than 0.4. This can be quite confusing.

Aside for statistics teachers

In statistics we often quote the R squared value from regression. To get it, we square r, the correlation coefficient, and what is quite a respectable value, like 0.6, gets reduced to a mere 0.36.

Effect of dividing by decimals between 0 and 1

Similarly, when we divide whole numbers by whole numbers, the answer will be less than the number we are dividing. 100 / 5 = 20. Twenty is less than 100, but in this case is greater than 5.  But when we divide by a decimal between 0 and 1 it all goes crazy and things get bigger! 100/ 0.5 = 200. People who are at home with all this madness don’t notice it, but I can see how it can alarm the novice.

Decimal arithmetic doesn’t behave like regular arithmetic

Addition and subtraction

When we add or subtract two numbers, we need to line up the decimal places, so that we know that we are adding values with corresponding place values. This is looks different from the standard algorithm where we line up the right-hand side. In fact it is the same, but because the decimal point is invisible, it doesn’t seem the same.

Method for multiplication of decimals

When you multiply numbers with decimals in, you do it like regular multiplication and then you count the number of digits to the right of the decimal in each of the factors and add them together and that is how many digits to have to the right of the decimal in the answer! I have a confession here. I know how to do this, and have taught how to do this, but I don’t recall ever working out why we do this or getting students to work it out.

Method for division of decimals

Is this even a thing? My immediate response is to use a calculator. I seem to remember moving the decimal point around in a somewhat cavalier manner so that it disappears from the number we are dividing by. But who ever does long division by hand?

Okay teacher friends – I now see why you find decimals difficult.

Answers

The paper talks about approaches that help. The main one is that students need to spend time on understanding about magnitude.

My suggestion is to do plenty of work using money. Somehow we can get our heads around that.

And use a calculator, along with judicious estimation.

Here are two videos I have made, to help people get their heads around decimals.

Improvisation in the Mathematics Classroom

The following is a guest post by Andrea Young, requested by Dr Nic Petty.

Improvisation comedy

Improvisation comedy, or improv for short, is theater that is unscripted.  Performers create characters, stories, and jokes on the spot, much to the delight of audience members.  Surprisingly, the goal of improv is not to be funny!  (Or maybe this isn’t surprising–people trying hard to be funny rarely succeed.)  Rather, improv comedians are encouraged to be “in the moment,” to support their fellow players, and to take risks–the humor follows as a natural consequence.

What does this have to do with mathematics and mathematics education?  If you are a math teacher or professor, you might want to have a classroom where students are deeply engaged with the lesson (i.e. are “in the moment”), actively collaborating with peers (i.e. supporting their fellow players), and willing to make mistakes (i.e. taking risks).  In other words, you want them to develop the skills that improvisers are trained in from their very first improv class.

I started taking improv classes in 2002 at the Hideout Theatre in Austin, TX right around the same time I started a Ph.D. program in mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin.  I realized that the dynamics being developed in my improv classes and troupes were exactly the ones I wanted to develop among the students in my math classes.  So I started using improv games and exercises in my courses.  And I haven’t stopped.  I have now taught mathematics to hundreds of college students, and in every course, I have incorporated some amount of improv.  I have given workshops and presentations to mathematicians, high school teachers, and students about how to use improv to improve group dynamics or to foster communication.   It is powerful to see joy and play cultivated in a college-level mathematics course.  Anecdotally, these techniques work–not for every student, every time–but for enough students enough of the time that I keep using my old favorites and finding new ones to try.

Andrea Young teaches math using Improv principles and games

Some improv exercises to try

Here are three exercises that you might try in your own math classes.  I use these in college classes, but they are easily (and some might argue, more readily) adaptable to younger ages.

Scream circle:  Have the students stand in a circle and put their heads down.  On the count of three, they should all raise their heads and look directly at another student.  If the person they are looking at is also looking at them, both students should scream and leave the circle.  If the other person is not looking at them, they put their head back down.  The game continues until there is only one or two (depending on group size) left.

This exercise is a great way to pair up students to work together.  It also develops the idea of risk-taking because students are encouraged to scream as loud as they can.  It is also quick–depending on the size of the class, this can take fewer than 2 minutes.

Five-headed expert:  Have five students come to the front of the room and stand in a line.  This can be played a few ways.   Here are two:

  1. The students respond to questions one word at a time, as though they are five heads on the same body. Introduce the visiting “expert” and ask them questions, related to course content.  Time permitting, have the class ask questions.
  2. The students respond to questions all in one voice. Otherwise, the game is the same.

This game is a fun way to review concepts and definitions. (For example, what is the limit definition of the derivative?)  It also works on the skills of collaboration and being “in the moment.”  Students must  listen to each other and work together to say things that make sense.

For an example of how this game works in an improv performance, watch this video from the improv group Stranger Things Have Happened.

I am a tree:   Have the students stand in a circle.  One student walks to the center and makes an “I am” statement while striking a pose.  The next student enters the circle and adds to the tableau with another “I am” statement.  A third (and probably final student) enters the tableau like the second.   The professor then clears the tableau, either leaving one of the students to repeat their “I am” statement or not.

This game really highlights the need for collaboration, especially when used in a math context.  I use this as a review or as a way to synthesize concepts. For example, this could be used to review different sets of numbers.  Student one might start with “I am the set of real numbers” and hold his or her arms in a big circle to indicate a set.  Student two could enter the “set” and say, “I am the rationals.”  Another student might intersect the reals with their arms and say, “I am the complex numbers.”

For an introduction to I am a tree, check out this demonstration video from my former improv teacher and troupe mate, Shana Merlin of Merlin Works.

Courage and innovation

I use a lot of active learning techniques in my classes, and I have found improv exercises to be a quick and fun way to develop some of the non-mathematical skills that my students need to be successful in my classroom.  It takes some courage to engage with your students in this way, but I think it is well worth it.

As a final thought, improvisational comedy techniques are not just for students. They can help professional mathematicians become better communicators and more effective teachers. They can even stimulate creativity and problem-solving skills. I encourage you to visit your local comedy theater and to sign up for an improv class.

Andrea Young and fellow trouper performing improvisational musical comedy

Background information and links

Andrea Young is the Special Assistant to the President and Liaison to the Board of Trustees AND an Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences at Ripon College.  For many years, she performed improv all around the country with Girls, Girls, Girls Improvised Musicals and a variety of other Austin improv troupes.  These days she mostly does community theater, although she regularly improvises silly songs and dances for her toddler.  For more about using improv in math courses, check out mathprov.wordpress.com.

Comment from Dr Nic

Thanks Andrea – it was so great to find someone who was already doing what I was thinking about doing. I would love to hear from other people who have used improv games and techniques in maths and statistics classes. I am learning improv at present, and like the idea of “Yes and…” I will write some more about this in time.

There are many good ways to teach mathematics

There are many good ways to teach mathematics and statistics

Hiding in the bookshelves in the University of Otago Library, I wept as I read the sentence, “There are many good ways to raise children.”  As a mother of a baby with severe disabilities the burden to get it right weighed down on me. This statement told me to put down the burden. I could do things differently from other mothers, and none of us needed to be wrong.

The same is true of teaching maths and stats – “There are many good ways to teach mathematics and statistics.” (Which is not to say that there are not also many bad ways to both parent and teach mathematics – but I like to be positive.)

My previous post about the messages about maths, sent by maths and stats videos, led to some interesting comments – thanks especially to Michael Pye who “couldn’t get the chart out of [his] head”. (Nothing warms a blogger’s heart more!). He was too generous to call my description of the “procedural approach” a “straw-person”, but might have some justification to do so.

His comments (you can see the originals here) have been incorporated in this table, with some of my own ideas. In some cases the “explicit active approach” is a mixture of the two extremes. The table was created to outline the message I felt the videos often give, and the message that is being encouraged in much of the maths education community. In this post we expand it to look at good ways to teach maths.

Procedural approach Explicit but active approach Social constructivist approach
Main ideas Maths is about choosing and using procedures correctly Maths is about understanding ideas and recognising patterns Maths is about exploring ideas and finding patterns
Strengths Orderly, structured, safe, cover the material, calm Orderly, structured, safe, cover the material, calm and satisfying Exciting, fun, annoying
Skills valued Computation, memorisation, speed, accuracy Computation, memorisation, (not speed), accuracy + the ability to evaluate and analyse Creativity, collaboration, communication, critical thinking
Teaching methods Demonstration, notes, practice Demonstration, notes, practice, guided discussion and exploration via modelling. Open-ended tasks, discussion, exploration
Grouping Students work alone or in ability grouping Students discuss as a whole class or in mixed-ability groups
Role of teacher Fount of wisdom, guide, enthusiast, coach. Fount of wisdom, guide, enthusiast, coach. Another learner, source of help, sometimes annoyingly oblique
Attitude to mistakes Mistakes are a sign of failure Mistakes happen when we learn. (high percentage of success) Mistakes happen when we learn.
Challenges Boredom, regimentation, may not develop resilience. Boredom, regimentation, could be taught purely to the test Can be difficult to tell if learning is taking place, difficult if the teacher is not confident
Who (of the learners) succeeds? People like our current maths teachers Not sure – hopefully everyone!
Use of worksheets and textbooks Important – guide the learning Develops mastery and provide assessment for learning. Limits gaps in understanding. Occasional use to supplement activities
Role of videos Can be central Reinforce ideas and provide support out of class. Support materials

Comments

We agree that speed is not important, so why are there still timed tests and “mad minutes” .

What is good mathematics teaching?

The previous post was about the messages sent by videos, and the table was used to fit the videos into a context. If we now examine the augmented table, we can address what we think good mathematics teaching looks like.

For WHOM?

The biggest question when discussing what works in education is “for whom does it work?”  Just about any method of teaching will be successful for some people, depending on how you measure success. Teachers have the challenge of meeting the needs of around thirty students who are all individuals, with individual needs.

Introversion/extraversion

I have recently been considering the scale from introvert – those who draw energy from working alone, and extraversion – those who draw energy from other people. Contrary to our desire to make everything binary, current thinking suggests that there is a continuum from totally introverted to totally extraverted. I was greatly relieved to hear that, as I have never been able to find my place at either end. I am happy to present to people, and will “work a room” if need be, thus appearing extraverted, but need to recover afterwards with time alone – thus introverted. Apparently I can now think of myself as an ambivert.

The procedural approach to teaching and learning mathematics is probably more appealing to those more at the introverted end of the spectrum, who would rather have fingernails extracted than work in a group. (And I suspect this would include a majority of incumbent maths teachers, though I am not sure about primary teachers.) I suspect that children who are more extroverted will gain from group work and community. If we choose either one of these modes of teaching exclusively we are disadvantaging one or other group.

Different cultures

In New Zealand we are finding that children from cultures where a more social approach is used for learning do better when part of learning communities that value their cultural background and group endeavour. In Japan it is expected that all children will master the material, and children are not ability-grouped into lowered expectations. Dominant white western culture is more competitive. One way for schools to encourage large numbers of phone calls from unhappy white middle-class parents is to remove “streaming”, “setting”, or “ability grouping.”

Silence and noise

I recently took part in a Twitter discussion with maths educators, one of whom believed that most maths classes should be undertaken in silence. One of the justifications was that exams will be taken in silence and individually. This may have worked for him, but for some students the pressure not to say anything is stifling. It also removes a great source of learning, their peers. Students who are embarrassed to ask a teacher for help can often get help from others. In fact some teachers require students to ask others before approaching the teacher.

Moderation

As is often the case, the answer lies in moderation and variety. I would not advocate destroying all worksheets and textbooks, nor mandate frequent silent individual work. Here are some of suggestions for effective teaching of mathematics.

Ideal maths teaching includes:

  • Having variety in your approaches, as well as security
  • Aiming for understanding and success
  • Trying new ideas and having fun
  • Embracing your own positive mathematical identity (and getting help if your mathematical identity is not positive)
  • Allowing children to work at different speeds without embarrassment
  • Having silence sometimes, and noise sometimes
  • Being competent or getting help – a good teaching method done poorly is not a good teaching method

Here are links to other posts related to this:
The Golden Rule doesn’t apply to teaching

Educating the heart with maths and statistics

The nature of mathematics and statistics and what it means to learn and teach them

And thank you again to those who took the time to comment on the previous post. I’m always interested in all viewpoints.

Educating the heart with maths and statistics

What has love got to do with maths?

This morning at the Twitter chat for teachers, (#bfc630nz) the discussion question was, How and what will you teach your students about life this year? As I lurked I was impressed at the ideas and ideals expressed by a mixed bunch of teachers from throughout New Zealand. I tweeted:  “I wonder how often maths teachers think about educating the heart. Yet maths affects how people feel so much.”

My teaching philosophy is summed up as “head, heart and hands”. I find the philosophy of constructivism appealing, that people create their own understanding and knowledge through experiences and reflection. I believe that learning is a social activity, and I am discovering that mathematics is a social endeavour. But underpinning it all I am convinced that people need to feel safe. That is where the heart comes in. “People do not care how much you know until they know how much you care.” Relationships are vital. I wrote previously about the nature of teaching statistics and mathematics.

Teachers are people

In the culture of NZ Maori, when someone begins to address a group of people, they give a mihi, which is an introductory speech following a given structure. The mihi has the role of placing the person with respect to their mountain, their river, their ancestors. It enables the listeners to know who the person is before they begin to speak about anything else. I am not fluent in te reo, so do not give a mihi in Maori (yet), but I do introduce myself so that listeners know who I am. Learners need to know why I am teaching, and how I feel about the subject and about them. It can feel self-indulgent, thinking surely it is about the subject, not about me. But for many learners the teacher is the subject. Just look at subject choices in high school students and that becomes apparent.

Recently I began studying art at an evening class. I am never a passive learner (and for that reason do feel sympathy for anyone teaching me). Anytime I have the privilege of being a learner, I find myself stepping back and evaluating my responses and thinking of what the teacher has done to evoke these responses. Last week, in the first lesson, the teacher gave no introduction other than her name, and I felt the loss. Art, like maths, is emotionally embedded, and I would have liked to have developed more of a relationship with my teacher, before exposing my vulnerability in my drawing attempts. She did a fine job of reassuring us that all of our attempts were beautiful, but I still would like to know who she is.

Don’t sweeten the broccoli

I suspect that some people believe that maths is a dry, sterile subject, where things are right or wrong. Many worksheets give that impression, with columns of similar problems in black and white, with similarly black and white answers. Some attempt to sweeten the broccoli by adding cartoon characters and using bright colours, but the task remains devoid of adventure and creativity. Now, as a child, I actually liked worksheets, but that is probably because they were easy for me, and I always got them right. I liked the column of little red ticks, and the 100% at the end. They did not challenge me intellectually, but I did not know any better. For many students such worksheets are offputting at best. Worksheets also give a limited view of the nature of mathematics.

I am currently discovering how narrow my perception of mathematics was. We are currently developing mathematical activities for young learners, and I have been reading books about mathematical discoveries. Mathematics is full of creativity and fun and adventure, opinion, multiple approaches, discussion and joy. The mathematics I loved was a poor two-dimensional faded version of the mathematics I am currently discovering.I fear most primary school teachers (and possibly many secondary school maths teachers) have little idea of the full potential of mathematics.

Some high school maths teachers struggle with the New Zealand school statistics curriculum. It is embedded in real-life data and investigations. It is not about calculating a mean or standard deviation, or some horrible algebraic manipulation of formulae. Statistics is about observing and wondering, about asking questions, collecting data, using graphs and summary statistics to make meaning out of the data and reflecting the results back to the original question before heading off on another question. Communication and critical thinking are vital. There are moral, ethical and political aspects to statistics.

Teaching mathematics and statistics is an act of social justice

I cannot express strongly enough that the teaching of mathematics and statistics is a political act. It is a question of social justice. In my PhD thesis work, I found that social deprivation correlated with opportunities to learn mathematics. My thoughts are that there are families where people struggle with literacy, but mostly parents from all walks of life can help their children with reading. However, there are many parents who have negative experiences around mathematics, who feel unable to engage their children in mathematical discussions, let alone help them with mathematics homework. And sadly they often entrench mathematical fatalism. “I was no good at maths, so it isn’t surprising that you are no good at maths.”

Our students need to know that we love them. When you have a class of 800 first year university students it is clearly not possible to build a personal relationship with each student in 24 contact hours. However the key to the ninety and nine is the one. If we show love and respect in our dealings with individuals in the class, if we treat each person as valued, if we take the time to listen and answer questions, the other students will see who we are. They will know that they can ask and be treated well, and they will know that we care. When we put time into working out good ways to explain things, when we experiment with different ways of teaching and assessing, when we smile and look happy to be there – all these things help students to know who we are, and that we care.

As teachers of mathematics and statistics we have daunting influence over the futures of our students. We need to make sure we are empowering out students, and having them feel safe is a good start.

10 hints to make the most of teaching and academic conferences

Hints for conference benefit maximisation

I am writing this post in a spartan bedroom in Glenn Hall at La Trobe University in Bundoora (Melbourne, Australia.) Some outrageously loud crows are doing what crows do best outside my window, and I am pondering on how to get the most out of conferences. In my previous life as a University academic, I attended a variety of conferences, and discovered some basic hints for enjoying them and feeling that my time was productively used. In the interests of helping conference newcomers I share them here. They are in no particular order.

1. Lower your expectations

Sad, but true, many conference presentations are obvious, obscure or dull. And some are annoying. If you happen to hit an interesting and entertaining presentation – make the most of it. I have talked to several newbies this afternoon whose experience of the MAV conference could be described as underwhelming. This is not the fault of the conference, but rather a characteristic of conferences as a whole. My rule of thumb is that if you get one inspiring or useful presentation per day you are winning. (Added later) You can generally find something positive in any presentation, and it is good to tweet that. (Thanks David Butler for reminding me!)

2. Pace yourself

When I first went to conferences I would make sure that I attended every session, feeling I needed to fulfil my obligations to the University that was kindly funding (or in those days, part-funding) my trip and attendance. Fortunately I was saved from exhaustion by my mentor, who pointed out that you had diminishing returns, if not negative returns on continued attendance beyond a certain point. Consequently I have learned to take a break and not attend every single presentation I can. Some down-time is also good for contemplating what you have heard. Conferences are also a chance to step back from the daily grind, and think about your own teaching practice or research.

3. Go to something out of your usual area of interest.

When I used to teach operations research, many of the research talks went whizzing over my head. But every now and then I would find a gem, which for me would be a wonderful story I could tell in lectures of how operations research had saved money, lives or the world from annihilation. You never know what you might find.

4. Remember “Names” are just people too.

It may be my colonial cringe, but I tend to be a little in awe of the “big names” in any field. These are the people who have been paid to attend the conference, who give keynote addresses, and you have actually heard of before. Next year at the NZAMT conference in October, Dan Meyer is going to be a keynote speaker. I have to say I am a little in awe of him, but at the same time know that that is silly. Dick de Veaux is one of my favourite keynote speakers and you could not ask for a nicer or more generous person. The point is that speakers are people too, and are playing a certain role at a conference, which means that they should give the punters some of their time. – So this is my advice to paid keynote speakers – be nice to people. It can’t hurt, and it can make a real difference in their lives. Because of my YouTube videos I have a small level of celebrity among some teachers and learners of statistics in New Zealand. (I said it was small) I LOVE it when people talk to me, and hope no one would feel reluctant. If it is in your power to do good, do it

5.Talk to people.

This can be daunting and tiring, but is essential to make the most of a conference opportunity. The point of conferences is to bring people together, so if you do not talk to anyone other than the people you came with, you could have stayed home and watched presentations on YouTube. I am learning that some conversation topics are easy starters : “Where are you from?”, “What do you teach/research?”, “Have you been to any good sessions?” “What did you think of the Keynote?” are all reasonably safe. To my surprise, criticising the US President elect was not universally well received, so I have learned to avoid that one. Being positive is a good idea, and one I need to remember at all times. When I do not agree with what a speaker is saying I have a tendency to growl in a Marge Simpsonesque way. This can be disturbing to the people around me and I am attempting to stop it.

At the 2016 MAV conference I had yellow hair, and immediately found kinship with a delightful and insightful young teacher with magenta hair. Now if we could just have found an attendee with cyan hair we could have impersonated a printer cartridge! I went to Sharon’s presentation and she to mine, and I believe we were both the better for it.

We have Yellow and Magenta - but where is Cyan?

We have Yellow and Magenta – but where is Cyan?

6. Be brave and give a presentation

The biennial NZ Association of Maths teachers conference is being held in Christchurch on 3rd to 6th October 2017. I strongly believe we need more input from primary teachers, and more collaboration across primary, secondary and tertiary. It would be SOO wonderful to have many primary teachers giving workshops or presentations of work they are doing in their maths classrooms.

The abstracts are due by the end of May and if any primary teachers would like some help putting one together, I would be really happy to help.

7. Visit the trade displays

The companies that have trade displays pay a considerable amount for the right to do so. I believe that teachers need producers of educational resources, and when you visit producers and give them the opportunity to talk about their product, it makes it worthwhile for them to sponsor, thus keeping the price down. And you never know – you might find something really useful!

8. Split up to maximise benefit.

If two or more of you come from the same school or organisation, it is a good idea to plan your programme together. When there are 40 – or even 10 presentations to choose from in any one slot, it is more sensible to attend different ones.

9. Plan ahead

It is really helpful to know when conferences are approaching, so I have added links below to the maths teaching conferences I know about, in the hope that many of you may think about attending. Do let me know any you know about that I haven’t listed.

10. Wear sensible shoes

This particularly applies to the MAV conference at La Trobe University. It is held on a massive campus, which is particularly confusing to get around, so one tends to cover far more ground than intended. I was pleased I sacrificed style for comfort in this particular instance, after a bad attack of blisters last year.

11.Add your own hints

Any other conference attenders here – what other suggestions could you make?

Mathematics and statistics teaching conferences in New Zealand and Australia

Primary Mathematics Association 25 March 2017, Auckland

AAMT 11 – 13 July 2017, Canberra, Australia

2017 MANSW Annual Conference 15-17 September 2017.

NZAMT 3 – 7 October 2017 Christchurch New Zealand

MAV Early Dec 2017 Melbourne, Australia

 

 

Play and learning mathematics and statistics

The role of play in learning

I have been reading further about teaching mathematics and came across this interesting assertion:

Play, understood as something frivolous, opposed to work, off-task behaviour, is not welcomed into most mathematics classrooms. But play is exactly what is needed. It is only play that can entice us to the type of repetition that is needed to learn how to inhabit the mathematical landscape and how to create new mathematics.
Friesen(2000) – unpublished thesis, cited in Stordy, Children Count, (2015)

Play and practice

It is an appealing idea that as children play, they have opportunities to engage in repetition that is needed in mastering some mathematical skills. The other morning I decided to do some exploration of prime numbers and factorising even before I got out of bed. (Don’t judge me!). It was fun, and I discovered some interesting properties, and came up with a way of labelling numbers as having two, three and more dimensions. 12 is a three dimensional number, as is 20, whereas 35 and 77 are good examples of two dimensional numbers. As I was thus playing on my own, I was aware that it was practising my tables and honing my ability to think multiplicatively. In this instance the statement from Friesen made sense. I admit I’m not sure what it means to “create new mathematics”. Perhaps that is what I was doing with my 2 and 3 dimensional numbers.

You may be wondering what this has to do with teaching statistics to adults. Bear with…

Traditional vs recent teaching methods for mathematics

Today on Twitter, someone asked what to do when a student says that they like being shown what to do, and then practising on textbook examples. This is the traditional method for teaching mathematics, and is currently not seen as ideal among many maths teachers (particularly those who inhabit the MathTwitterBlogosphere or MTBoS, as it is called). There is strong support for a more investigative, socially constructed approach to learning and teaching mathematics.  I realise that as a learner, I was happy enough learning maths by being shown what to do and then practising. I suspect a large proportion of maths teachers also liked doing that. Khan Academy videos are wildly popular with many learners and far too many teachers because they perpetuate this procedural view of mathematics. So is the procedural approach wrong? I think what it comes down to is what we are trying to teach. Were I to teach mathematics again I would not use “show then practise” as my modus operandi. I would like to teach children to become mathematicians rather than mathematical technicians. For this reason, the philosophies and methods of Youcubed, Dan Meyer and other MTBoS bloggers have appeal.

Play and statistics

Now I want to turn my thoughts to statistics. Is there a need for more play in statistics? Can statistics be playful in the way that mathematics can be playful? Operations Research is just one game after another! Simulation, critical path, network analysis, travelling salesperson, knapsack problem? They are all big games. Probability is immensely playful, but what about statistical analysis? Can and should statistics be playful?

My first response is that there is no play in statistics. Statistics is serious and important, and deals with reality, not joyous abstract ideas like prime numbers and the Fibonacci series – and two and three dimensional numbers.

The excitement of a fresh set of data

But there is that frisson of excitement as you finally finish cleaning your database and a freshly minted set of variables and observations beckons to you, with SPSS, SAS or even Excel at your fingertips. A new set of data is a new journey of discovery. Of course a serious researcher has already worked out a methodical route through her hypotheses… maybe. Or do we mostly all fossick about looking for patterns and insights, growing more and more familiar with the feel of the data, as if we were squeezing it through our fingers? So yes – my experience of data exploration is playful. It is an adventure, with wrong turns, forgetting the path, starting again, finding something only to lose it again and finally saying “enough” and taking a break, not because the data has been exhausted, but because I am.

Writing the report is like cleaning up

Writing up statistical analysis is less exciting. It feels like picking up the gardening tools and putting them away after weeding the garden. Or cleaning the paintbrushes after creating a masterpiece. That was not one of my strengths – finishing and tidying up afterwards. The problem was that I felt I had finished when the original task had been completed – when the weeds had been pulled or the painting completed. In my view, cleaning and putting away the tools was an afterthought that dragged on after the completion of the task, and too often got ignored. Happily I have managed to change my behaviour by rethinking the nature of the weeding task. The weeding task is complete when the weeds are pulled and in the compost and the implements are resting clean and safe where they belong. Similarly a statistical analysis is not what comes before the report-writing, but is rather the whole process, ending when the report is complete, and the data is carefully stored away for another day. I wonder if that is the message we give our students – a thought for another post.

Can statistics be playful?

For I have not yet answered the question. Can statistics be playful in the way that mathematics can be playful? We want to embed play in order to make our task of repetition be more enjoyable, and learning statistics requires repetition, in order to develop skills and learn to differentiate the universal from the individual. One problem is that statistics can seem so serious. When we use databases about global warming, species extinction, cancer screening, crime detection, income discrepancies and similarly adult topics, it can seem almost blasphemous to be too playful about it.

I suspect that one reason our statistics videos on YouTube are so popular is because they are playful.

helen-has-attitude

Helen has an attitude problem

Helen has a real attitude problem and hurls snarky comments at her brother, Luke. The apples fall in an odd way, and Dr Nic pops up in strange places. This playfulness keeps the audience engaged in a way that serious, grown up themes may not. This is why we invented Ear Pox in our video about Risk and screening, because being playful about cancer is inappropriate.

Ear Pox is imaginary disease for which we are studying the screening risk.

Ear Pox is imaginary disease for which we are studying the screening risk.

Dragonistics data cards provide light-hearted data which yields worth-while results.

A set of 240 Dragonistics data cards provides light-hearted data which yields satisfying results.

When I began this post I did not intend to bring it around to the videos and the Dragonistics data cards, but I have ended up there anyway. Maybe that is the appeal of the Dragonistics data cards –  that they avoid the gravitas of true and real grown-up data, and maintain a playfulness that is more engaging than reality. There is a truthiness about them – the two species – green and red dragons are different enough to present as different animal species, and the rules of danger and breath-type make sense. But students may happily play with the dragon cards without fear of ignorance or even irreverence of a real-life context.

What started me thinking about play with regards to learning maths and statistics is our Cat Maths cards. There are just so many ways to play with them that I can see Cat Maths cards playing an integral part in a junior primary classroom. This is why we created them and want them to make their way into classrooms. Sadly, our Kickstarter campaign was unsuccessful, but we hope to work with an established game manufacturer to bring them to the market by the end of 2017.

We'd love your help.

We’d love your help.

Your thoughts about play and statistics

And maybe we need to be thinking a little more about the role of play in learning statistics – even for adults! What do you think? Can and should statistics be playful? And for what age group? Do you find statistical analysis fun?

 

Mathematics teaching Rockstar – Jo Boaler

Moving around the education sector

My life in education has included being a High School maths teacher, then teaching at university for 20 years. I then made resources and gave professional development workshops for secondary school teachers. It was exciting to see the new statistics curriculum being implemented into the New Zealand schools. And now we are making resources and participating in the primary school sector. It is wonderful to learn from each level of teaching. We would all benefit from more discussion across the levels.

Educational theory and idea-promoters

My father used to say (and the sexism has not escaped me) “Never run after a woman, a bus or an educational theory, as there will be another one along soon.” Education theories have lifespans, and some theories are more useful than others. I am not a fan of “learning styles” and fear they have served many students ill. However, there are some current ideas and idea-promoters in the teaching of mathematics that I find very attractive. I will begin with Jo Boaler, and intend to introduce you over the next few weeks to Dan Meyer, Carol Dweck and the person who wrote “Making it stick.”

Jo Boaler – Click here for official information

My first contact with Jo Boaler was reading “The Elephant in the Classroom.” In this Jo points out how society is complicit in the idea of a “maths brain”. Somehow it is socially acceptable to admit or be almost defensively proud of being “no good at maths”. A major problem with this is that her research suggests that later success in life is connected to attainment in mathematics. In order to address this, Jo explores a less procedural approach to teaching mathematics, including greater communication and collaboration.

Mathematical Mindsets

It is interesting to  see the effect Jo Boaler’s recent book, “Mathematical Mindsets “, is having on colleagues in the teaching profession. The maths advisors based in Canterbury NZ are strong proponents of her idea of “rich tasks”. Here are some tweets about the book:

“I am loving Mathematical Mindsets by @joboaler – seriously – everyone needs to read this”

“Even if you don’t teach maths this book will change how you teach for ever.”

“Hands down the most important thing I have ever read in my life”

What I get from Jo Boaler’s work is that we need to rethink how we teach mathematics. The methods that worked for mathematics teachers are not the methods we need to be using for everyone. The defence “The old ways worked for me” is not defensible in terms of inclusion and equity. I will not even try to boil down her approach in this post, but rather suggest readers visit her website and read the book!

At Statistics Learning Centre we are committed to producing materials that fit with sound pedagogical methods. Our Dragonistics data cards are perfect for use in a number of rich tasks. We are constantly thinking of ways to embed mathematics and statistics tasks into the curriculum of other subjects.

Challenges of implementation

I am aware that many of you readers are not primary or secondary teachers. There are so many barriers to getting mathematics taught in a more exciting, integrated and effective way. Primary teachers are not mathematics specialists, and may well feel less confident in their maths ability. Secondary mathematics teachers may feel constrained by the curriculum and the constant assessment in the last three years of schooling in New Zealand. And tertiary teachers have little incentive to improve their teaching, as it takes time from the more valued work of research.

Though it would be exciting if Jo Boaler’s ideas and methods were espoused in their entirety at all levels of mathematics teaching, I am aware that this is unlikely – as in a probability of zero. However, I believe that all teachers at all levels can all improve, even a little at a time. We at Statistics Learning Centre are committed to this vision. Through our blog, our resources, our games, our videos, our lessons and our professional development we aim to empower all teacher to teach statistics – better! We espouse the theories and teachings explained in Mathematical Mindsets, and hope that you also will learn about them, and endeavour to put them into place, whatever level you teach at.

Do tell us if Jo Boalers work has had an impact on what you do. How can the ideas apply at all levels of teaching? Do teachers need to have a growth mindset about their own ability to improve their teaching?

Here are some quotes to leave you with:

Mathematical Mindsets Quotes

“Many parents have asked me: What is the point of my child explaining their work if they can get the answer right? My answer is always the same: Explaining your work is what, in mathematics, we call reasoning, and reasoning is central to the discipline of mathematics.”
“Numerous research studies (Silver, 1994) have shown that when students are given opportunities to pose mathematics problems, to consider a situation and think of a mathematics question to ask of it—which is the essence of real mathematics—they become more deeply engaged and perform at higher levels.”
“The researchers found that when students were given problems to solve, and they did not know methods to solve them, but they were given opportunity to explore the problems, they became curious, and their brains were primed to learn new methods, so that when teachers taught the methods, students paid greater attention to them and were more motivated to learn them. The researchers published their results with the title “A Time for Telling,” and they argued that the question is not “Should we tell or explain methods?” but “When is the best time do this?”
“five suggestions that can work to open mathematics tasks and increase their potential for learning: Open up the task so that there are multiple methods, pathways, and representations. Include inquiry opportunities. Ask the problem before teaching the method. Add a visual component and ask students how they see the mathematics. Extend the task to make it lower floor and higher ceiling. Ask students to convince and reason; be skeptical.”

All quotes from

Jo Boaler, Mathematical Mindsets: Unleashing Students’ Potential through Creative Math, Inspiring Messages and Innovative Teaching

Enriching mathematics with statistics

Statistics enriches everything!

In many school systems in the world, subjects are taught separately. In primary school, children  learn reading and writing, maths and social studies at different times of the day. But more than that, many topics within subjects are also taught separately. In mathematics we often teach computational skills, geometry, measurement and statistics in separate topics throughout the school year. Textbooks tend to encourage this segmentation of the curriculum. This causes problems as students compartmentalise their learning.  They think that something learned in mathematics can’t possibly be used in Physics. They complain in mathematics if they are asked to write a sentence or a report, saying that it belongs in English.

I participated in an interesting discussion on Twitter recently about Stretch and Challenge. (Thanks #mathschat) My interpretation of “Stretch and challenge” is ways of getting students to extend their thinking beyond the original task so that they are learning more and feeling challenged. This reminds me a lot of the idea of “Low floor High Ceiling” that Jo Boaler talks about. We need tasks that are easy for students to get started on, but that do not limit students, particularly ones who have really caught onto the task and wish to keep going.

Fractions

As a statistics educator, I see applications of statistics and probability everywhere. At a workshop on proportional thinking we were each asked to represent three-quarters, having been told that our A5 piece of paper was “one”. When I saw the different representations used by the participants, I could see a graph as a great way to represent it. You could make a quick set of axes on a whiteboard, and get people to put crosses on which representation they used. The task of categorising all the representations reinforces the idea that there are many ways to show the same thing. It also gets students more aware of the different representations. Then the barchart/dotplot provides a reminder of the outcome of the task. Students who are excited about this idea could make up a little questionnaire to take home and get other family members to draw different fractions, and look at the representations, adding them to the graph back at school.

Measurement

Measurement is an area of the mathematics curriculum that is just begging to be combined with statistics. Just physically measuring an object leads to a variation in responses, which can be graphed. Getting each child to measure each object three times and take the middle value, should lead to a distribution of values with less spread. And then there is estimation. I love the example Dan Meyer uses in his Ted talk in 2010 of filling a tank with water. Students could be asked their estimate of the filling time, simply by guessing, and then use mathematical modelling to refine their estimate. Both values can be graphed and compared.

Area and Probability

Area calculations can be used nicely with probability. Children can invent games that involve tossing a coin onto a shape or shapes. The score depends on whether the coin lands within the shape, outside the shape or on a line. They can estimate what the score will be from 10 throws, simply by looking at the shape, then try it out with one lot of ten throws. Now do some area calculations. Students may have different ways of dealing with the overlap issue. Use the area calculations to improve their theoretical estimates of the probability of each outcome, and from there work out the expected value. Then do multiple trials of ten throws and see how you need to modify the model.  So much learning in one task!

Statistics obviously fits well in much topic work as well. The Olympics are looming, with all the interest and the flood of statistics they provide. Students can be given the fascinating question of which country does the best? There are so many ways to measure and to account for population. Drawing graphs gives an idea of spread and distribution.

There is so much you can do with statistics and other strands and other curriculum areas!  Statistics requires a context, and it is economical use of time if the context is something else you are teaching.

Can you tell me some ways you have incorporated statistics into other strands of mathematics or other subject areas?

There’s more to reading graphs than meets the eye

There’s more to reading graphs than meets the eye

For those of us who know how to read a graph, it can be difficult to imagine what another person could find difficult. But then when I am presented with an unusual style of graph, or one where the data has been presented badly, I suddenly feel empathy for those who are less graph-literate.

Graphs are more common now as we have Excel to make them for us – for better or worse. An important skill for the citizens of tomorrow and today is to be able to read a graph or table and to be critical of how well it accomplishes its goals.

Here are some stages of reading a graph, much of which also applies to reading a table.

Reading about the graph

When one is familiar with graphs, and the graph is well made, we can become oblivious to the conventions. Just as readers know that English is written from left to right, graph readers understand that the height of a bar chart corresponds to the quantity of something. When people familiar with graphs look at a graph, they take in information unconsciously. This would include what type of graph it is – bar chart, line graph, scatterplot…and what it is about – the title, axis labels and legend tell us this. And they are also able to ignore unimportant aspects. For example if someone has made a 3-D bar chart, experienced graph-readers know that the thickness of the bar does not express information. Colours are generally used to distinguish different elements, but the choice of which colour is used is seldom part of the message. Other aspects about graphs, which may or may not be apparent, include the purpose of the graph and the source of the data.

Beginner graph readers need to learn how to use the various conventions to read ABOUT the data or graph. Any exploration of a graph needs to start with the question, “What is this graph about?”

Identifying one piece of data

When children start making and reading graphs, it is good for them to start with data about themselves, often represented in a picture graph, where each individual observation is shown.  A picture graph is concrete. Each child may point out their particular piece of data – the one that says that they like Wheaties, or prefer mushrooms on their pizza. This is an early stage in  the process of abstraction, that leads eventually to understanding less intuitive graphs such as the box and whisker or a time series chart. It is also important for all graph readers to be aware what each piece of data, or observation, represents and how it is represented.

Identifying one piece of data may help avoid the confusion of graphs which show raw data rather than summary data. For an example, a class may have data about the number of people in households. If this data is entered raw into a spreadsheet, and a graph created, we can end up with something like the graph immediately below (Graph 1).

This is not a good graph, but is what a naive user may well get out of Excel

Graph 1: This is not a good graph, but is what a naive user may well get out of Excel

In this we can identify that each member is represented by a bar, and the height gives the number of people in their family. I usually call this a value graph, as it shows only the individual values, with no aggregation.

A more useful representation of this same data is a summary bar chart, as shown below. (Graph 2) There are two dimensions operating. Horizontally we have the number of people in a household, and vertically we have the number of class members that have the corresponding number of people in their household. Note that it is less intuitive seeing where each class member is. Dividing the bar up into individual blocks can help with that.

Household size

Graph 2: A summary of the size of household for a group of people

Reading off the graph

In order to make sense of a graph, we often need to look at two dimensions simultaneously. If we wish to know how many people in the class come from a household of 5, we need to select along the horizontal axis, the value 5. Then we follow the bar up to the top and take our eye back to the vertical axis to see how high this value is. A ruler can help with this process.  When we read off a graph, our statements tend to be summaries of a single attribute, such as “There are 2 people who come from households of 6.”  “There are 17 dragons that breathe fire.”

Reading within the graph (comparisons, relationships)

Reading within the graph is a more complex task, even with simple graphs. When we read within a graph we are interested in comparisons and relationships. For example we may wish to see which breath type is most common among our herd of dragons. In order to answer this using the graph below, we first need to find the highest bar, by drawing our eye along the top, or drawing a ruler down the page. Then we look down that bar, and read of the name of the breath type. There are many more complex relationships, such as whether green dragons tend to be taller or shorter than red dragons, and which are more likely to be friendly. By introducing another attribute, we are in fact adding a dimension to our analysis.

This is a column chart (or bar chart) summarising the breath types.

This is a column chart (or bar chart) summarising the breath types.

Reading beyond the graph, beyond the data

This idea of reading beyond the data has been suggested as a step towards informal and then formal inference. We can perceive that our data does not represent all existing instances, and can make predictions or suppositions about what might happen in the other instances. For example, for our sample of dragons, we have seen that the green dragons tend to be more likely to be friendly than the red dragons. We could surmise that this holds over the other dragons as well. We can introduce this idea by asking the students, “I wish to have a new dragon join the herd and would prefer it to be friendly. Would I be better to get a green dragon or a red dragon?”

Judging the graph

The advantage of programs like Excel is that many people can make graphs without too much trouble. This is also a problem, as often the graph Excel produces is not really suitable for the task, and can have all sorts of visual clutter which obscures the information displayed. Learners need to think about the graph, either their own, or one they are reading and ask whether it is successful in communicating correctly the information that needs to be communicated. Does the graph serve the purpose it was created for?

I suggest that the steps listed here are a worthwhile structure to use in reading graphs, particularly for beginners. This then leads into another process, summarised as OSEM. You can read about this here in this post, A helpful structure for analysing graphs.