Lessons for a budding Social Enterprise from Elevate

Statistics Learning Centre is a social enterprise set up by Dr Nic Petty and Dr Shane Dye after leaving the University of Canterbury. Our aim is to help the world to feel better about mathematics and statistics, by inventing, creating and disseminating resources and ideas to learners and teachers. We believe that facility and confidence with mathematics and statistics is as important as literacy in enabling individuals to participate fully in their world.

We didn’t always have our mission or aim or vision as well articulated, and if asked we tended to give some vague description like – “we make stuff to help people learn maths and statistics.”

StatsLC identifies as a social enterprise because we are driven by a purpose beyond making profit for shareholders, and our purpose is a social good – in this case education. A social enterprise exists in the continuum between a business which operates for profit, and a charity, which is strictly not-for-profit, but measures its effectiveness in different ways. We wish ultimately to be self-sustaining so that we are not at the mercy of grants or contracts with outside providers.

Ākina Elevate

We, the directors, have spent the last eight months, on and off, working on our purpose, customer focus, financials and operations as part of an Elevate course with Ākina. The course is aimed at social enterprises, and we have been participating with between five and eight other social enterprises based in Christchurch, New Zealand.

At our last session Ākina wanted to know what value we have gained from the course, what it does well and what can be improved. Ākina itself is a social enterprise that helps other social enterprises. Social Enterprise is a popular phenomenon, particularly in our area, where recently Ākina hosted the World Forum.

Impact

The first unit of four sessions, one morning per week, addressed our impact. We needed to identify what we are trying to achieve, why and how. We talked about vision, mission and purpose. This would help us later to think about who are our customers and who are our beneficiaries.  I still find the delineation between vision, mission and purpose a bit confusing. Our vision has expanded during the course. This is where we are up to now, though it is still a work in progress.

Vision – a world of mathematicians

Purpose: We invent, create and disseminate resources and ideas to enable people to learn and teach mathematics and statistics enjoyably and effectively.

We invent resources to enable people to learn mathematics enjoyably
create and and and and
disseminate ideas teach statistics effectively

As we considered our impact we realised that we are making an impact. We have over 1000 views of this blog daily. There are over 35,000 subscribers on our Youtube channel. Hundreds of children and teachers have been inspired and enthused by our “Rich Maths” events. You can see more about our impact here: Statistics Learning Centre Impact.

We have not been doing well at specifying exactly what impact we aim to have, and measuring it. Originally our impact was with teachers and learners of secondary and university level statistics. However we are now thinking bigger, and wish to create a world of mathematicians.  We truly believe that education is a political act, and knowledge of maths and statistics empowers people, allows greater career choice and enables informed citizenship.

Customer

The “customer” or marketing section of the course was the one we felt most in need of, and probably are still most in need of. We learned that we need to ask what problem we are solving and for whom. This has led to serious thought and discussion on our part as we have so many ideas about how we can do good, and for whom. However, the point of social enterprise is that you are not a charity, so need to trade or provide services for money in order to be sustainable. So we need to identify our customers – the people and organisations that will pay money for what we do – either for them or for others.

At the time we were gearing up for a holiday programme, and we used some of the ideas to advertise on Facebook. One outcome of the course is that we have decided we need to employ someone to help with the marketing.

Financial

As we already have an accounting package, Xero, and work with an accountant, the need for help here felt less imperative. We have developed different systems in using Xero that will help us analyse our progress. One idea that was valuable was to do with the value of our time. Time and money emphasis did not have to be commensurate in all circumstances. Two sessions on budgets were helpful when thinking about grant applications. We have thought more about cashflow, though a crisis at the end of 2016 had already made us aware of potential problems. We started paying ourselves.

What has become clear throughout the course is that we do not have enough time between the two of us to do all the things we need, as well as maintaining cashflow through contracts. This has helped us to recognise the need to employ someone to cover our areas of weakness, in particular marketing. We also need to develop more passive income streams.

Operations

What was extremely valuable in this section was learning about employment contracts and health and safety. We are now formalising our contracts with staff. Being a responsible employer, even for family members, takes a bit of work.

Another useful session concerned governance, management and operations. As a small enterprise, both of us tend to fill all three roles. At this point we need to get some advice at the governance level – even just having someone to ask us questions and to report to periodically. It can be easy to spend too much time chipping away at the coalface, and losing direction. It can also be seductive to spend all our time discussing visionary ideas for future development, rather than getting on and producing. Like most of life, the answer lies in a balance.

Other thoughts

A common expression in social enterprise is Mission Drift meaning letting the commercial aspects over-ride the social impact focus or mission.

We tend to suffer from something similar, that I call mission lurch. I’m not sure it is the right term, as it is more that we are adapting our mission in order to align it better with activities that will lead to sustainability. Our problem is that we need to be doing some more activities that bring in revenue to sustain our mission.

One big benefit from participating in the programme has been making contact and building relationships with others in similar circumstances. This builds confidence.

Big lessons

For me the big lessons from this course are

  • Articulating our mission
  • Confidence to do something big

A year ago I was quite happy to dabble around in the edges of business/social enterprise. We were not really making enough to keep us going, but had hope that something might change. Over the course of 2017 we have had contracts with Unlocking Curious Minds, to take exciting maths events to primary schools. We have also gained contracts writing materials for other organisations. Our success in these endeavours, along with the help from the Elevate course has helped us to think bigger.

Watch this space!

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Rich maths with Dragons

Thanks to the Unlocking Curious Minds fund, StatsLC have been enabled to visit thirty rural schools in Canterbury and the West Coast and provide a two-hour maths event to help the children to see themselves as mathematicians. The groups include up to 60 children, ranging from 7 to 12 years old – all mixed in together. You can see a list of the schools we have visited on our Rich Maths webpage.

What mathematicians do

What do mathematicians do?

We begin by talking about what mathematicians do, drawing on the approach Tracy Zager uses in “Becoming the Math teacher you wish you had”. (I talk more about this in my post on What Mathematicians do.)

  • Mathematicians like a challenge.
  • Mathematicians notice things and wonder
  • Mathematicians make mistakes and learn
  • Mathematicians work together and alone.
  • Mathematicians have fun.

You can see a video of one of our earlier visits here.

Each child (and teacher) is given a dragon card on a lanyard and we do some “noticing and wondering” about the symbols on the cards. We find that by looking at other people’s dragons as well as our own, we can learn more. As each of the symbols is explained, there follows an excited buzz as children discuss whose dragon is stronger or older, or has more dangerous breath.  We wonder if green dragons are more friendly than red dragons and work together, making a human data table, and using proportional thinking to draw some conclusions.

Dragonistics data cards

A small sample of Dragonistics data cards

Mixed group work

Next, in randomly chosen, mixed level groups of three, the children perform their own statistical investigations. They have randomly assigned roles, as dragon minder (looking after the cards), people minder (making sure everyone is participating) or record minder (making sure something gets written down). They take their roles seriously, and only occasionally does a group fail to work well. The teachers are free to observe or join in, while Shane and I go from group to group observing and providing guidance and feedback. All learners can take part at their own level.

As we visit a variety of schools we can see the children who are more accustomed to open-ended activities. In some schools, and with the older children, they can quickly start their own investigations. Other children may need more prompting to know where to begin. Sometimes they begin by dividing up the 24 cards among the three children, but this is not effective when the aim is to study what they can find from a group of dragons.

Levels of analysis

It is interesting to observe the levels of sophistication in their analysis. Some groups start by writing out the details of each individual card. I find it difficult to refrain from moving them on to something else, but have come to realise that it is an important stage for some children, to really get to understand the multivariate nature of the data before they begin looking at properties of the group. Others write summaries of each of the individual characteristics. And some engage in bivariate or multivariate investigations. In a sequence of lessons, a teacher would have more time to let the learners struggle over what to do next and to explore, but in our short timeframe we are keen for them to find success in discovering something. After about fifteen minutes we get their attention, and get them to make their way around the room and look at what the other groups are finding out. “Mathematicians learn from other mathematicians”, we tell them.

Claims

Sometimes groups think they have discovered everything there is to know about their set of dragons, so we have a range of “claims” for them to explore. These include statements such as:

  • Is this true? “There are more green dragons than red dragons.”
  • Is this true? “Changeable dragons are less common than friendly or dangerous dragons.”
  • Is this true? “There are more dragons younger than 200 than older than 200.”
  • Is this true? “Fire breathing dragons are mainly female.”
  • Is this true? “There are no fire breathing, dangerous green dragons.”
  • Is this true? “Strong dragons are more dangerous.”

Some of the claims are more easily answered than others, and all hint at the idea of sample and population in an intuitive rather than explicit way. Many of them require decisions from the learners, such as what does “mainly” mean, and how you would define a “strong” dragon?

The children love to report back their findings.  Depending on the group and the venue, we also play big running around games where they have to form pairs and groups, such as 2 metres different in height, one of each behaviour, or nothing at all the same. That has proved one of the favourite activities, and encourages communication, mathematical language – and fun! Then we let them choose their own groups and choose from a range of mathematical activities involving the Dragonistics data cards.

The children work on one or more of the activities in groups of their own choice, or on their own. Then in the last fifteen minutes we gather them together to revisit the five things that mathematicians do, and liken it to what they have been doing. We get the children to ask questions, and we leave a set of Dragonistics data cards with the school so they can continue to use them in their learning. It is a blast! We have had children tell us it feels like the first time they have ever enjoyed mathematics. Every school is different, and we have learned from each one.

Solved the puzzle!Three mathematicians showing their work

A wise intervention

The aim is for our event to help children to change the way they feel about maths in a way that empowers them to learn in the future. There has been research done on “wise interventions”, which have impact greater than their initial effect, due to ongoing ripples of influence. We believe that helping students to think about struggle, mistakes and challenge in mathematics in a positive light, and to think of themselves as mathematicians can reframe future events in maths. When they find things difficult, they may see that as being a mathematician, rather than as failing.

Lessons for us

This is a wonderful opportunity for us to repeat a similar activity with multiple groups, and our practice and theory are being informed by this. Here is an interesting example.

At the beginning of the open-choice section, we outline the different activities that the children can choose from. One is called “Activity Sheets”, which has varying degrees of challenge. It seems the more we talk up the level of challenge in one of the activities, the keener the children are to try it. Here is a picture of the activity:

Challenging 9 card

The activity involves placing nine dragons cards in position to make all of the statements true. Originally the packs included just 20 dragons, and by swapping in and out, it is challenging. However, when you have just nine dragons to place, it can be very difficult. Now for the first few visits, when children rushed to show us how they had completed their sheet, we would check it for correctness. However, through reading, thinking and discussion we have changed out behaviour. We wish to put the emphasis on the learning, and on the strategy. Peter Johnston in his book, “Choice words: how our language affects children’s learning” states,

“The language we choose in our interactions with children influences the ways they frame these events and the ways the events influence their developing sense of agency.”

When we simply checked their work, we retained our position as “expert”. Now we ask them how they know it is correct, and what strategies they used. We might ask if they would find it easier to do it a second time, or which parts are the trickiest. By discussing the task, rather than the result, we are encouraging their enjoyment of the process rather than the finished product.

We hope to be able to take these and other activities to many more schools either in person or through other means, and thus spread further the ripples of mathematical and statistical enjoyment.

Teach students to learn to fish

There is a common saying that goes roughly, “Give a person a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a person to fish and you feed her for a lifetime.”

Statistics education is all about teaching people to fish. In a topic on questionnaire design, we choose as our application the consumption of sugar drinks, the latest health evil. We get the students to design questionnaires to find out drinking habits. Clearly we don’t want to focus too much on the sugar drink aspect, as this is the context rather than the point of the learning. What we do want to focus on is the process, so that in future, students can transfer their experience writing a questionnaire about sugar drinks to designing a questionnaire about another topic, such as chocolate, or shoe-buying habits.

Questionnaire design is part of the New Zealand school curriculum, and the process includes a desk-check and a pilot survey. When the students are assessed, they must show the process they have gone through in order to produce the final questionnaire. The process is at least as important as the resulting questionnaire itself.

Here is our latest video, teaching the process of questionnaire design.

Examples help learning

Another important learning tool is the use of examples. When I am writing computer code, I usually search on the web or in the manual for a similar piece of code, and work out how it works and adapt it. When I am trying to make a graphic of something, I look around at other graphics, and see what works for me and what does not. I use what I have learned in developing my own graphics. Similarly when we are teaching questionnaire design, we should have examples of good questionnaires, and not so good questionnaires, so that students can see what they are aiming for. This is especially true for statistical report-writing, where a good example can be very helpful for students to see what is required.

Learning how to learn

But I’d like to take it a step further. Perhaps as well as teaching how to design a questionnaire, or write a report, we should be teaching how to learn how to design a questionnaire. This is a transferable skill to many areas of statistics and probability as well as operations research, mathematics, life… This is teaching people to be “life-long learners”, a popular catchphrase.

We could start the topic by asking, “How would you learn how to design a questionnaire?” then see what the students come up with. If I were trying to learn how to design a questionnaire, I would look at what the process might entail. I would think about the whole statistical process, thinking about similarities and differences. I would think about things that could go wrong in a questionnaire. I would also spend some time on the web, and particularly YouTube, looking at lessons on how to design a questionnaire. I would ask questions. I would look at good questionnaires. I would then try out my process, perhaps on a smaller problem. I would evaluate my process by looking at the end-result. I would think about what worked and what didn’t, and what I would do next time.

This gives us three layers of learning, Our students are learning how to write a questionnaire about sugar drinks, and the output from that is a questionnaire. They are also learning the general process of designing a questionnaire, that can be transferred to other questionnaire contexts. Then at the next level up, they are learning how to learn a process, in this case the process of designing a questionnaire. This skill can be transferred to learning other skills or processes, such as writing a time series report, or setting up an experiment or critiquing a statistical report.

Levels of learning in the statistics classroom

Levels of learning in the statistics classroom

I suspect that the top layer of learning how to learn is often neglected, but is a necessary skill for success at higher learning. We are keen as teachers to make sure that students have all the materials and experiences they need in order to learn processes and concepts. Maybe we need to think a bit more about giving students more opportunities to be consciously learning how to learn new processes and concepts.

We can liken it a little to learning history. When a class studies a certain period in history, there are important concepts and processes that they are also learning, as well as the specifics of that topic. In reality the topic is pretty much arbitrary, as it is the tool by which the students learn history skills, such as critical thinking, comparing, drawing parallels and summarising. In statistics the context, though hopefully interesting, is seldom important in itself. What matters is the concepts, skills and attitudes the student develops through the analysis. The higher level in history might be to learn how to learn about a new philosophical approach, whereas the higher level in statistics is learning how to learn a process.

The materials we provide at Statistics Learning Centre are mainly fishing lessons, with some examples of good and bad fish.  It would be great if we could also use them to develop students’ ability to learn new things, as well as to do statistics. Something to work towards!

How to learn statistics (Part 2)

Some more help (preaching?) for students of statistics

Last week I outlined the first five principles to help people to learn and study statistics.

They focussed on how you need to practise in order to be good at statistics and you should not wait until you understand it completely before you start applying. I sometimes call this suspending disbelief. Next I talked about the importance of context in a statistical investigation, which is one of the ways that statistics is different from pure mathematics. And finally I stressed the importance of technology as a tool, not only for doing the analysis, but for exploring ideas and gaining understanding.

Here are the next five principles (plus 2):

6. Terminology is important and at times inconsistent

There are several issues with regard to statistical terminology, and I have written a post with ideas for teachers on how to teach terminology.

One issue with terminology is that some words that are used in the study of statistics have meanings in everyday life that are not the same. A clear example of this is the word, “significant”. In regular usage this can mean important or relevant, yet in statistics, it means that there is evidence that an effect that shows up in the sample also exists in the population.

Another issue is that statistics is a relatively young science and there are inconsistencies in terminology. We just have to live with that. Depending on the discipline in which the statistical analysis is applied or studied, different terms can mean the same thing, or very close to it.

A third language problem is that mixed in with the ambiguity of results, and judgment calls, there are some things that are definitely wrong. Teachers and examiners can be extremely picky. In this case I would suggest memorising the correct or accepted terminology for confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. For example I am very fussy about the explanation for the R-squared value in regression. Too often I hear that it says how much of the dependent variable is explained by the independent variable. There needs to be the word “variation” inserted in there to make it acceptable. I encourage my students to memorise a format for writing up such things. This does not substitute for understanding, but the language required is precise, so having a specific way to write it is fine.

This problem with terminology can be quite frustrating, but I think it helps to have it out in the open. Think of it as learning a new language, which is often the case in new subject. Use glossaries, to make sure you really do know what a term means.

7. Discussion is important

This is linked with the issue of language and vocabulary. One way to really learn something is to talk about it with someone else and even to try and teach it to someone else. Most teachers realise that the reason they know something pretty well, is because they have had to teach it. If your class does not include group work, set up your own study group. Talk about the principles as well as the analysis and context, and try to use the language of statistics. Working on assignments together is usually fine, so long as you write them up individually, or according to the assessment requirements.

8. Written communication skills are important

Mathematics has often been a subject of choice for students who are not fluent in English. They can perform well because there is little writing involved in a traditional mathematics course. Statistics is a different matter, though, as all students should be writing reports. This can be difficult at the start, but as students learn to follow a structure, it can be made more palatable. A statistics report is not a work of creative writing, and it is okay to use the same sentence structure more than once. Neither is a statistics report a narrative of what you did to get to the results. Generous use of headings makes a statistical report easier to read and to write. A long report is not better than a short report, if all the relevant details are there.

9. Statistics has an ethical and moral aspect

This principle is interesting, as many teachers of statistics come from a mathematical background, and so have not had exposure to the ethical aspects of research themselves. That is no excuse for students to park their ethics at the door of the classroom. I will be pushing for more consideration of ethical aspects of research as part of the curriculum in New Zealand. Students should not be doing experiments on human subjects that involve delicate subjects such as abuse, or bullying. They should not involve alcohol or other harmful substances. They should be aware of the potential to do harm, and make sure that any participants have been given full information and given consent. This can be quite a hurdle, but is part of being an ethical human being. It also helps students to be more aware when giving or withholding consent in medical and other studies.

10. The study of statistics can change the way you view the world

Sometimes when we learn something at school, it stays at school and has no impact on our everyday lives. This should not be the case with the study of statistics. As we learn about uncertainty and variation we start to see this in the world around us. When we learn about sampling and non-sampling errors, we become more critical of opinion polls and other research reported in the media. As we discover the power of statistical analysis and experimentation, we start to see the importance of evidence-based practice in medicine, social interventions and the like.

11. Statistics is an inherently interesting and relevant subject.

And it can be so much fun. There is a real excitement in exploring data, and becoming a detective. If you aren’t having fun, you aren’t doing it right!

12. Resources from Statistics Learning Centre will help you learn.

Of course!

How to study statistics (Part 1)

To students of statistics

Most of my posts are directed at teachers and how to teach statistics. The blog this week and next is devoted to students. I present principles that will help you to learn statistics. I’m turning them into a poster, which I will make available for you to printing later. I’d love to hear from other teachers as I add to my list of principles.

1. Statistics is learned by doing

One of the best predictors of success in any subject is how much time you spent on it. If you want to learn statistics, you need to put in time. It is good to read the notes and the textbook, and to look up things on the internet and even to watch Youtube videos if they are good ones. But the most important way to learn statistics is by doing. You need to practise at the skills that are needed by a statistician, which include logical thinking, interpretation, judgment and writing. Your teacher should provide you with worthwhile practice activities, and helpful timely feedback. Good textbooks have good practice exercises. On-line materials have many practice exercises.

Given a choice, do the exercises that have answers available. It is very important that you check what you are doing, as it is detrimental to practise something in the wrong way. Or if you are using an on-line resource, make sure you check your answers as you go, so that you gain from the feedback and avoid developing bad habits.

So really the first principle should really be “statistics is learned by doing correctly.

2. Understanding comes with application, not before.

Do not wait until you understand what you are doing before you get started. The understanding comes as you do the work. When we learn to speak, we do not wait until we understand grammatical structure before saying anything. We use what we have to speak and to listen, and as we do so we gain an understanding of how language works.  I have found that students who spent a lot of time working through the process of calculating conditional probabilities for screening tests grew to understand the “why” as well as the “how” of the process. Repeated application of using Excel to fit a line to bivariate data and explaining what it meant, enabled students to understand and internalise what a line means. As I have taught statistics for two decades, my own understanding has continued to grow.

There is a proviso. You need to think about what you are doing, and you need to do worthwhile exercises. For example, mechanically calculating the standard deviation of a set of numbers devoid of context will not help you understand standard deviation. Looking at graphs and trying to guess what the standard deviation is, would be a better exercise. Then applying the value to the context is better still.

Applying statistical principles to a wide variety of contexts helps us to discern what is specific to a problem and what is general for all problems. This brings us to the next principle.

3. Spend time exploring the context.

In a statistical analysis, context is vital, and often very interesting. You need to understand the problem that gave rise to the investigation and collection of the data. The context is what makes each statistical investigation different. Statisticians often work alongside other researchers in areas such as medicine, psychology, biology and geology, who provide the contextual background to the problem. This provides a wonderful opportunity for the statistician to learn about a whole range of different subjects. The interplay between the data and context mean that every investigation is different.

In a classroom setting you will not have the subject expert available, but you do need to understand the story behind the data. These days, finding out is possible with a click of a Google or Wikipedia button. Knowing the background to the data helps you to make more sensible judgments – and it makes it more interesting.

4. Statistics is different from mathematics

In mathematics, particularly pure mathematics, context is stripped away in order to reveal the inner pure truth of numbers and logic.  There are applied areas involving mathematics, which are more like statistics, such as operations research and engineering. At school level, one of the things that characterises the study of maths is right and wrong answers, with a minimum of ambiguity. That is what I loved about mathematics – being able to apply an algorithm and get a correct answer. In statistics, however, things are seldom black-and-white.  In statistics you will need to interpret data from the perspective of the real world, and often the answer is not clear. Some people find the lack of certainty in statistics disturbing. There is considerable room for discussion in statistics. Some aspects of statistics are fuzzy, such as what to do with messy data, or which is the “best” model to fit a time series. There is a greater need for the ability to write in statistics, which makes if more challenging for students for whom English is not their native language.

5. Technology is essential

With computers and calculators, all sorts of activities are available to help learn statistics. Graphs and graphics enable exploration that was not possible when graphs had to be drawn by hand. You can have a multivariate data set and explore all the possible relationships with a few clicks. You should always look at the data in a graphical form before setting out to analyse.

Sometimes I would set optional exercises for students to explore the relationship between data, graphs and summary measures. Very few students did so, but when I led them through the same examples one at a time I could see the lights go on. When you are given opportunities to use computing power to explore and learn – do it!

But wait…there’s more

Here we have the first five principles for students learning statistics. Watch this space next week for some more. And do add some in the comments and I will try to incorporate your ideas as well.