10 hints to make the most of teaching and academic conferences

Hints for conference benefit maximisation

I am writing this post in a spartan bedroom in Glenn Hall at La Trobe University in Bundoora (Melbourne, Australia.) Some outrageously loud crows are doing what crows do best outside my window, and I am pondering on how to get the most out of conferences. In my previous life as a University academic, I attended a variety of conferences, and discovered some basic hints for enjoying them and feeling that my time was productively used. In the interests of helping conference newcomers I share them here. They are in no particular order.

1. Lower your expectations

Sad, but true, many conference presentations are obvious, obscure or dull. And some are annoying. If you happen to hit an interesting and entertaining presentation – make the most of it. I have talked to several newbies this afternoon whose experience of the MAV conference could be described as underwhelming. This is not the fault of the conference, but rather a characteristic of conferences as a whole. My rule of thumb is that if you get one inspiring or useful presentation per day you are winning. (Added later) You can generally find something positive in any presentation, and it is good to tweet that. (Thanks David Butler for reminding me!)

2. Pace yourself

When I first went to conferences I would make sure that I attended every session, feeling I needed to fulfil my obligations to the University that was kindly funding (or in those days, part-funding) my trip and attendance. Fortunately I was saved from exhaustion by my mentor, who pointed out that you had diminishing returns, if not negative returns on continued attendance beyond a certain point. Consequently I have learned to take a break and not attend every single presentation I can. Some down-time is also good for contemplating what you have heard. Conferences are also a chance to step back from the daily grind, and think about your own teaching practice or research.

3. Go to something out of your usual area of interest.

When I used to teach operations research, many of the research talks went whizzing over my head. But every now and then I would find a gem, which for me would be a wonderful story I could tell in lectures of how operations research had saved money, lives or the world from annihilation. You never know what you might find.

4. Remember “Names” are just people too.

It may be my colonial cringe, but I tend to be a little in awe of the “big names” in any field. These are the people who have been paid to attend the conference, who give keynote addresses, and you have actually heard of before. Next year at the NZAMT conference in October, Dan Meyer is going to be a keynote speaker. I have to say I am a little in awe of him, but at the same time know that that is silly. Dick de Veaux is one of my favourite keynote speakers and you could not ask for a nicer or more generous person. The point is that speakers are people too, and are playing a certain role at a conference, which means that they should give the punters some of their time. – So this is my advice to paid keynote speakers – be nice to people. It can’t hurt, and it can make a real difference in their lives. Because of my YouTube videos I have a small level of celebrity among some teachers and learners of statistics in New Zealand. (I said it was small) I LOVE it when people talk to me, and hope no one would feel reluctant. If it is in your power to do good, do it

5.Talk to people.

This can be daunting and tiring, but is essential to make the most of a conference opportunity. The point of conferences is to bring people together, so if you do not talk to anyone other than the people you came with, you could have stayed home and watched presentations on YouTube. I am learning that some conversation topics are easy starters : “Where are you from?”, “What do you teach/research?”, “Have you been to any good sessions?” “What did you think of the Keynote?” are all reasonably safe. To my surprise, criticising the US President elect was not universally well received, so I have learned to avoid that one. Being positive is a good idea, and one I need to remember at all times. When I do not agree with what a speaker is saying I have a tendency to growl in a Marge Simpsonesque way. This can be disturbing to the people around me and I am attempting to stop it.

At the 2016 MAV conference I had yellow hair, and immediately found kinship with a delightful and insightful young teacher with magenta hair. Now if we could just have found an attendee with cyan hair we could have impersonated a printer cartridge! I went to Sharon’s presentation and she to mine, and I believe we were both the better for it.

We have Yellow and Magenta - but where is Cyan?

We have Yellow and Magenta – but where is Cyan?

6. Be brave and give a presentation

The biennial NZ Association of Maths teachers conference is being held in Christchurch on 3rd to 6th October 2017. I strongly believe we need more input from primary teachers, and more collaboration across primary, secondary and tertiary. It would be SOO wonderful to have many primary teachers giving workshops or presentations of work they are doing in their maths classrooms.

The abstracts are due by the end of May and if any primary teachers would like some help putting one together, I would be really happy to help.

7. Visit the trade displays

The companies that have trade displays pay a considerable amount for the right to do so. I believe that teachers need producers of educational resources, and when you visit producers and give them the opportunity to talk about their product, it makes it worthwhile for them to sponsor, thus keeping the price down. And you never know – you might find something really useful!

8. Split up to maximise benefit.

If two or more of you come from the same school or organisation, it is a good idea to plan your programme together. When there are 40 – or even 10 presentations to choose from in any one slot, it is more sensible to attend different ones.

9. Plan ahead

It is really helpful to know when conferences are approaching, so I have added links below to the maths teaching conferences I know about, in the hope that many of you may think about attending. Do let me know any you know about that I haven’t listed.

10. Wear sensible shoes

This particularly applies to the MAV conference at La Trobe University. It is held on a massive campus, which is particularly confusing to get around, so one tends to cover far more ground than intended. I was pleased I sacrificed style for comfort in this particular instance, after a bad attack of blisters last year.

11.Add your own hints

Any other conference attenders here – what other suggestions could you make?

Mathematics and statistics teaching conferences in New Zealand and Australia

Primary Mathematics Association 25 March 2017, Auckland

AAMT 11 – 13 July 2017, Canberra, Australia

2017 MANSW Annual Conference 15-17 September 2017.

NZAMT 3 – 7 October 2017 Christchurch New Zealand

MAV Early Dec 2017 Melbourne, Australia

 

 

This entry was posted in mathematics, practicality and tagged , , by Dr Nic. Bookmark the permalink.

About Dr Nic

I love to teach just about anything. My specialties are statistics and operations research. I have insider knowledge on Autism through my family. I have a lovely husband, two grown-up sons, a fabulous daughter-in-law and an adorable grandson. I have several blogs - Learn and Teach Statistics, and Building a Statistics Learning Community, are the main ones.

7 thoughts on “10 hints to make the most of teaching and academic conferences

  1. I would suggest getting business cards. A bit old, but some people requested them from me and I wasn’t prepared for it at earlier conferences. Also, take lots of notes. I get so much out of conferences but it’s not always easy to remember the details without taking a peek at my notes, the resources first.

  2. Reblogged this on geenpuntsite and commented:
    Now that the conference season has ended for most of us Dr. Nic from Learn & Teach Statistics shares 10 useful tips and tricks when attending conferences. Although I learned some of these the hard way, some of them are actually new to me.

    I have only one thing to add that I learned the hard way: know your audience both when you pick your clothes and when you prepare your slides. I’ve been overdressed a number of times (there really is NO need for a suit when dealing with environmental economists) and suffered through many incomprehensible presentations and probably made the public suffer through a number of mine.

    If you haven’t been to a particular conference before ask friends or colleagues who have.

  3. Pingback: Some hints for conferences – and an additional one from me: know your audience – Mereconomics

  4. To Organisers re Name badges
    LARGE FONT: peering at bosoms and crotches is embarrassing
    first name, last name, institution: all that’s needed for good personal communication
    titles superfluous and intimidating
    department/discipline? maybe useful in mixed discipline conferences

    • I totally agree and now take my own large print name badge. Also the lanyard-type nametags need to be printed on both sides. It must be a form of Murphy’s law that they more often than not seem to have the name facing the owner.

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