Teachers and resource providers – uneasy bedfellows

Trade stands and cautious teachers

It is interesting to provide a trade stand at a teachers’ conference. Some teachers are keen to find out about new things, and come to see how we can help them. Others studiously avoid eye-contact in the fear that we might try to sell them something. Trade stand holders regularly put sweets and chocolate out as “bait” so that teachers will approach close enough to engage. Maybe it gives the teachers an excuse to come closer? Either way it is representative of the uneasy relationship that “trade” has with salaried educators.

Money and education

Money and education have an uneasy relationship. For schools to function, they need considerable funding – always more than what they get. In New Zealand, and in many countries, education is predominantly funded by the state. Schools are built and equipped, teachers are paid and resources are purchased with money provided by the taxpayer. Extras are raised through donations from parents and fund-raising efforts. However, because it is not apparent that money is changing hands, schools are perceived as virtuous establishments, existing only because of the goodness of the teachers. This contrasts with the attitude to resource providers, who are sometimes treated as parasitic with their motives being all about the money. It is possible that some resource providers are in it just for the money, but it seems to me that there are richer seams to mine in health, sport, retail etc.

Statistics Learning Centre is a social enterprise

Statistics Learning Centre is a social enterprise. We fit in the fuzzy area between “not-for-profit” and commercial enterprise. We measure our success by the impact we are having in empowering teachers to teach statistics and all people to understand statistics. We need money in order to continue to make an impact. Statistics Learning Centre has made considerable contributions to the teaching and learning of statistics in New Zealand and beyond for several years. This post lists just some of the impact we have had.  We believe in what we are doing, and work hard so that our social enterprise is on a solid financial footing.

StatsLC empowers teachers

Soon after the change to the NCEA Statistics standards, there was a shortage of good quality practice external exams. Even the ones provided as official exemplars did not really fit the curriculum. Teachers approached us, requesting that we create practice exams that they could trust were correct and aligned to the curriculum. We did so in 2015 and 2016, at considerable personal effort and only marginal financial recompense. We see that as helping statistics to be better understood in schools and the wider community.

We, at Statistics Learning Centre, grasp at opportunities to teach teachers how to teach statistics better, to empower all teachers to teach statistics. Our workshops are well received, and we have regular attenders who know they will get value for their time. We use an inclusive, engaging approach, and participants have a good time. I believe in our resources – the videos, the quizzes, the data cards, the activities, the professional development. I believe that they are among the best you can get. So when I give workshops, I do talk about the resources. It would seem counter-productive for all concerned, not to mention contrived, to do otherwise. They are part of a full professional development session. Many mathematical associations have no trouble with this, and I love to go to conferences, and contribute.

I am aware that there are some commercial enterprises who wish to give commercial presentations at conferences. If their materials are not of a high standard, this can put the organisers in a difficult position. Consequently some organisations have a blanket ban on any presentations that reference any paid product. I feel this is a little unfortunate, as teachers miss out on worthwhile contributions. But I understand the problem.

The Open Market model – supply and demand

I believe that there is value in a market model for resources.  People have suggested that we should get the Government to fund access to Statistics Learning Centre resources for all schools. That would be delightful, and give us the freedom and time to create even better resources. But that would make it almost impossible for any other new provider, who may have an even better product, to get a look in. When such a monopoly occurs, it reduces the incentives for providers to keep improving.

Saving work for the teachers, and building on a product

Teachers want the best for their students, and have limited budgets. They may spend considerable amounts of time printing, cutting and laminating in order to provide teaching resources at a low cost. This was one of the drivers for producing our Dragonistics data cards – to provide at a reasonable cost, some ready-made, robust resources, so that teachers did not have to make their own. As it turned out we were able to provide interesting data with clear relationships, and engaging graphics so that we provide something more than just data turned into datacards.

Free resources

There are free resources available on the internet. Other resources are provided by teachers who are sharing what they have done while teaching their own students. Resources provided for free can be of a high pedagogical standard. Having a high production standard, however, can be prohibitively expensive for individual producers who are working in their spare time.  It can also be tricky for another teacher to know what is suitable, and a lot of time can be spent trying to find high quality, reliable resources.

Teachers and resource providers – a symbiotic relationship

Teachers need good resource providers. It makes sense for experts to create high quality resources, drawing on current thinking with regard to content specific pedagogy. These can support teachers, particularly in areas in which they are less confident, such as statistics. And they do need to be paid for their work.

It helps when people recognise that our materials are sound and innovative, when they give us opportunities to contribute and when they include us at the decision-making table. Let us know how we can help you, and in partnership we can become better bed-fellows.

What do you think?


(Note that this post is also being published on our blog: Building a Statistics Learning  Community, as I felt it was important,)


One thought on “Teachers and resource providers – uneasy bedfellows

  1. Pingback: Symbiosis between teachers and resource providers | Building a Statistics Learning Community

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